170×170 day 83 22.7.15

83 22.7.15  villanelle EQ seven Quatrain 170x170

Moon’s silver rays paint a sad haunting scene

Stars watch from sky above and simmer

Behind the veils of mist and clouds

chilled night wind kisses makes birds shiver

though snuggled within the blankets of leaves green.

 

 

Envelop Quintet

Rhyme Scheme a. b. b. b. a. or a, b, c, b, a Iambic Pentameter or 10 syllables suggested

 

Ghosts lurking

Followed by goblin

Oh no don’t fret

Its only Halloween.

 

Rules of a Quatrain:

Did you notice that a quatrain is formed by two rhyming couplets? Easy! This pattern is called a a b b. The first line rhymes with the second (sky and by) and the third line rhymes with the fourth line (edge and ledge). Other quatrain patterns are a b a b,

a b b a, and a b c b.

 

 

 

Gone are the children that used to play

under sun, moon and rain

Poplar trees in gentle wind sway.

 

Who does life allows to stay?

Here today tomorrow gone

Gone are the children that used to play

 

Now deer, birds sometimes stray

When there is no one

Poplar trees in gentle wind sway.

 

The gardener’s daughter dries hay

On the roof of deserted mansion

Gone are the children that used to play.

 

In the night foxes merrily play

The hounds that hunted them are gone

Poplar trees in gentle wind sway.

 

Accepting life’s whimsical way

The mansion will gently mourn

gone are the children that used to play

Poplar trees in gentle wind sway.

 

 

 

 

Rules of Villanelle

A villanelle is an early French form with 19 lines using only 2 rhymes, traditionally broken into 6 verses. It’s kind of obsessive, with lines 1 & 3 repeating alternately, the 4th time as lines 18 & 19 ( 1,6,9,12 are the same line repeated four times & 3, 9, 15 and 19 are the same line repeated four times- the remaining 11 lines of poem rhyme(??) All the examples of villanelle I read in them the remaining 11 lines rhyme 1, 2 with 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11 and so on.)

 

One traditional form of poetry that can be fun to write, is technically easy compared to the most challenging forms, and often surprises the poet with its twists and discoveries, is the villanelle.

Villanelles have been around for at least three hundred years. Its name derives from the Italian villa, or country house, where noblemen went to refresh themselves, perhaps dally with the locals, and imagine that they were back to nature. It seems to have grown out of native songs, with their frequent refrains and complex rhyming.

 

Tuck

From here

Stitch extra there,

Life!

 

Rules of Seven

1-2-3-1 syllables or words, create a scene or statement.

 

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